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. ramin mellegard joins us from the business desk. we saw many americans celebrating the re-election of president obama but it seems the mood was different on wall street. >> it really was. we're seeing the reactions following the elections. investors really concerned about tax and spending issues and that's going to be a major focus going forwd. government spending cults and tax hikes are set to go into effect at the end of the year. the so-called fiscal cliff. investors worry obama will be unable to resolve the crisis with the house of representatives still controlled by the republicans. the key index on the new york stock exchange fell sharply when markets reopened after the election. the dow jones industrial average at one point lost over 360 points. the index finished the day at 12,932, down 2.3% from the previous day's close. new york stocks dliped from the start as investor concerns shifted to how obama will address the country's economic challenges. they're particularly worried the fiscal cliff could weigh down u.s. growth into the new year. >> it's a pretty sad day
>>glad to have you with us on this edition of "newsline." it's friday, november 9th. president assad says he will live and die in syria. he dismissed rumors he will leave his country and warned against any military intervention. he says he is staying where he is and a foreign intervention woulead to a catastrophe. >> it will have a domino affect. >> government and opposition forces have not let up in their fact. the rebels fired at the presidenti pale in damascus on wednesday where assad is believed to be staying. >>> japanese lead esers are concerned about the number of ships from china's waters to the east sea. chinese ships started to appear in japanese waters on a regular basis in september just after japan nationalized three of the century senkaku islands. >>> chinese leaders are taking part in a process that's highly control and highly secretive. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint leaders for the five years to come. >> reporter: the congress opened thursday morning in beijing's great hall of the people. it's about a ten-m
of early elections. one of the world's biggest consumers of fuel may be self-relia self-reliant. u.s. us a makers churn out car after car but it seems americans will making more fuel to power them. >> that's light. industry analysts expect a major shift will take place in the near future. we're hearing the united states will become the world's largest oil producer in the next five years. the iea said u.s. oil output would surpass saudi arabia. commercial production has already begun. the agency says the u.s. will be nearly self-sufficient in energy by 2035. that's due to an expected surge in production of shale gas. a type of natural gas trapped in under ground rock. america relies on it for 20% of import needs. now let's get a check on the markets. the yen is losing ground slightly against the dollar and the euro. dollar/yen is changing hands at 79.57 and the euro/yen is quoted at 100.99 to 104. debt stricken greece could get bail out funds. share prices are rising slightly in tokyo. this morning the index stands at 8,695. that's up about two-tenths of a percent. the index fell six days
. >>> glad to have you with us on this edition of "newsline." asia pacific leaders set their sights on an ambition goal, creating a trading block with an output of $20 trillion. a total population of about 3.4 billion people. the leaders of 16 countries have agreed to start negotiations in the new year. the heads of the association of southeast asian nations met in cambodia's capital. the leaders of six regional partners including japan, china, and india joined them at the summit. they issued a joint kmun ka that said they hope to reach agreement by the end of 2015. leader from japan, china, and south korea agreed to start talking on a free trade agreement of their own. they said they would put aside the territorial disputes between japan and the two other nations. japanese officials want to ease restrictions to give them more access to their neighbor's economies. chinese and south korean officials have already begun talks on a free trade deal between their countries. now negotiators involved in discussions for another free trade zone in the asia pacific say they hope to conclude an
country is ready to do what it takes to defend its people. u.s. president barack obama spoke with netanyahu. they agree they need to stop attacks. morsi says the israelis must realize their aggression will only lead to instability in the region. iran has condemned israel's military assault on the gaza strip. the iranian foreign minister had to convince israel to stop its military aggression. >>> another round of talks on iran's nuclear program is about to resume. negotiators will meet in brussels next week in their latest attempt to move the discussions forward. negotiations between the six nations and iran have been suspended since they last met in june in moscow. the two sides have failed to make any significant progress on the issue. they are demanding iran halt its program. it's concern that the end product could be used to develop nuclear weapons. foreign policy chief kathryn ashton and negotiators of the six countries will discuss a new nuclear proposal for iran. >>> the company responsible for the massive gulf of mexico oil spill is facing the largest criminal fine in
's to u.s. lawmakers: avert the fiscal cliff, or risk a credit downgrade. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we're going global with legendary investor mark mobius, franklin templeton's top strategist on the state of emerging marketnow. >> susie: and picture this: the u.s. is just a few years away from being the world's top oil producer, and self-sufficient. we'll tell you who's making that prediction, and investment strategies for your portfolio. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s.'s top-notch credit rating is at risk. that's the warning today from moody's investor's service. the ratings agency told u.s. lawmakers that when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the time to act is now, not next year. moody's said if action on averting the cliff is delayed until 2013, it might downgrade the stellar credit rating on u.s. debt. right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fisca
.e.o. of macy's tells us for holiday shoppers the line between online and in-store is blurred like never before. and market monitor guest bernie schaeffer is making his list. we'll tell you what he's buying now. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." we begin with what has become the un-official post- thanksgiving past-time for many americans: shopping. the black friday doorbuster sales began earlier than ever. yesterday, in fact. but stores were busy with shoppers hunting for deals. holiday sales are expected to increase by about 4% this year, to more than $580 billion, according to the national retail federation. allison worrell kicks off out coverage of retail's big day. >> it's 5:30 in the morning at one of miami's most popular malls, and while it may look tame now, but this is the calm before the black friday shopping storm. >> reporter: from the victoria's secret's pink, to the apple store, people are enthusiastic about buying and it shows. david vaton is on the hunt for an ipad mini and he says when it comes to getting a good deal, sleep is overrated. >> i stayed up the whole night, i did not
. and the white house warned republicans against using the debt limit as leverage to force agreement. >> asking for... that a political price be paid in order for congress to do its job, to ensure that the united states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history, is deeply irresponsible. >> reporter: at least talks are going on. the speaker and the president spoke by phone for almost half an hour last night. but a first negotiating round between treasury secretary timothy geithner and congressional leaders did nothing to improve the tone on capitol hill. democrats said the ball was in the speaker's court. >> we're saying, extend the tax cuts for the middle class as part of that. we know if we do nothing, the top rates go up. we're waiting for the republicans to come forward with something. that's our proposal, period. >> reporter: no one in washington ever thought negotiations to get past the fiscal cliff would be easy. now, more and more are talking about a rerun of what happened with the tarp bailout bill. first, congress may have to deadlock and go over
us from the business desk. >> we've been reporting for quite a while now on government leaders really trying to attempt to wrestle with their budgets along with international lenders and it looks like this latest effort is going to drag on until later this month. eurozone finance ministers have shelved a decision on another bailout for greece until november. they want an austerity deal with international lenders first. finance ministers from 17 countries held a telephone witness to discuss the bailout. they said greece has yet to reach agreement on specification austerity measures with its creditors. the creditors include the european union and international mown tear fund. the austerity measures are a precondition for fresh emergency loans to avoid a potential default. the finance ministers urged the greek government to reach a consensus on labor reforms. the ministers will again discuss the greek bailouts when they meet on november 12th. greece is taking that pressure from the eu seriously. the government there has submitted a revitdsed draft budget to parliament outlining yet more
can do if the u.s. heads into recession because of the fiscal cliff, bernanke says, not much. >> in the worse case scenario, where the economy goes off the broad fiscal cliff, the largest fiscal cliff, which, according the c.b.o. and our analys, would send the u.s. economy into recession, i don't think the fed has the tools to offset that. >> susie: members of the audience agreed. >> he was very frank in saying, you know, "we can try," he essentially said, "we will try, but we don't have anything in our arsenal that comes close." >> susie: bernanke is already using the weapons in his arsenal to fix the job market, which he said today is still "unhealthy". he also repeated the fed's plan to keep interest rates super low at least into 2015. >> we will want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence among households and businesses. >> susie: but bernanke gave no hints on when americans can expect to see higher rates. >> the further we go down the road, the question
. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. massive spending cuts and tax hikes are set to hit the u.s. economy on january first. by most estimates if we go over the cliff, the u.s. onomy will plunge into recession. >> susie: we look at the impact of the coming cliff and whether congress and the white house can strike a deal. >> tom: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! it was the chairman of the federal reserve ben bernanke who first called it a fiscal cliff. he described the coming automatic cuts in government spending and increases in taxes as, quote, "a massive fiscal cliff," end quote. here's what he was describing: on january 1, 2013, tax breaks worth $416 billion will expire. spending on things like defense, medicare payments to doctors will be slashed by $65 billion. add it all up and you are talking about cutting roughly half a trillion dollars from the federal budget. the congressional budget office and others warn going over the cliff will send the economy into a recession in the first half of next year. it was congress and the white house that set the deadline in hopes of forcing each other to cut
. >>> the leaders of asia's top economies want to work out a free trade agreement. ramin mellegard joins us from the business desk. there are so many trade negotiations going on worldwide. what are the details in this case? >> catherine, representatives of japan, china, and south korea are trying to get together this month to talk about starting negotiations for a free trade pact. the countries have agreed there are benefits to strengthening economic ties as the move towards free trade accelerates worldwide. leaders of the three countries had agreed in may that they would begin the trade negotiations by the end of this year. preparations had been made in working-level meetings but prospects for the talks were unclear in the shadow of the japan/china territory i am dispute over islands in the east china sea. the official launch of fta talks is now expected to get the green light. on the sidelines of the east asia summit in cambodia on november 20th. >>> u.s. president barack obama declared his intention to raise taxes on wealthy americans. he says he wants to discuss this openly with republicans
and led to the worst oil spill in u.s. history. inits guilty ple b.p. saidt deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than h
program. he'll likely ask china to persuade the north to skrapt launch. u.s. analysts said recent satellite photos said pyongyang may fire another missile. north korean military leaders launched what they called a satellite from the same pace in april. western intelligence analysts said the device, which crashed, was a long-range missile. >>> people at a japanese electronics company are interested in strength ning their renewable energy department. ai uchida from the business desk joins us now. >> i want to tell you specifically about rechargeable batteries or storage batteries. they're use envelope households during pow area outages, they're useful to drivers who use them in place of gasoline. the people at nec in japan understand that this is a growing and important market. the japanese electronics firm will join the bidding for a bankrupt u.s. company making storage batteries. nec officials say they want to buy the failed batterymaker a 1, 2, 3 systems. the u.s. firm filed for bankruptcy protection last month. it will be up for auction in early december. sources say nec could e
. that means palestinians have gained more powers but u.s. and isiseli leaders argue it throws up more barriers on the road to peace. >> reporter: it was a historic day for palestinians. before the vote palestinians president made his last plea to gain the support of delegation from u.n. member states. >> translator: i am hoping everyone's decision will give a birth certificate to the state of palestine. >> the assembly voted on a resolution to award palstines nonmember state. >> the result of the voting is as follows. in favor, 138. opposed, 9. abstentions, 41. >> reporter: an overwhelming majority voted in favor. among the minority who voted against resolution were israel and the united states. they argue that the palestine state hood should be negotiated between the two parties first. thursday's vote was a significant victory for the palestinians after their bid to gain full u.n. membership was shelved in the security council. being recognized as a state pal stain my exercise its new right to investigate alleged war crimes by israel. critics say it would the detrimental. it remains to be see
reaffirmed egypt's commitment to the palestinian cause and a need for just resolution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton helped negotiate the deal. she promised to work with partners in the region. the israeli military killed about 160 palestinians during the conflict. palestinian militants fired rockets from the gaza strip that killed five israelis. prime minister netanyahu said the right thing is to reach a lasting cease-fire but he warned of a wider military operation if security was threatened. hamas leader mashau warned his forces would resume attacks if israel broke the truce. >>> people in jerusalem are wondering if the cease-fire will hold. cohey sue gee has covered the middle east for years. he was in gaza on the first day of the offensive. kohei, why did the two sides agree to this truce? >> reporter: well, thousands of rockets have been fired since israeli forces withdrew from gaza in 2005. the israelis seemed to have come to the conclusion that they succeed the in reducing the ability of hamas to attack. and i think the influence of the u.s. contributed to bringing a
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the firs
for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elect
is on assignment tonight. a repeated warning to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, ext
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, dvid ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many o
. >> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. a week after the presidential election, the u.s. catholic bishops vowed to remain active on several hot-button issues, including gay marriage, which, despite the bishops' opposition, was legalized by voters in three states. at their annual fall meeting in baltimore, the bishops also voted down a statement on poverty and the economy. those opposed argued it was not strong enough and failed to significantly highlight church teachings on social justice. meanwhile, the bishops voted unanimously to push for sainthood for dorothy day, co-founder of the catholic worker movent. day died in 80. she spearheaded a nationwide effort to help the poor and homeless. >>> according to new figures from the census bureau, more than 49 million americans, close to one in six, lived in poverty last year. that number reflects a new approach to calculating poverty that takes into account money spent on healthcare, childcare and other living expenses. it also factors in government aid such as food stamps and tax credits. the new model does not replace the
and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going
the u.s. he said american official leaders have promised to minimize the global consequences of official tightening. >>> president barack obama and mitt romney are making their final pitches before americans head to the polls. obama visited three swing states. he told a crowd in wisconsin that romney would resurrect the republican policies of four years ago and preserve tax cuts for the wealthy. >> it's a choice between returning to the top down policies that crashed our economy or a future that's built on providing opportunity to everybody and growing a strong middle class. >> romney also campaigned in swing states. he told an audience in florida that obama had failed to deliver on promises to reduce the economic burden on americans. >> tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. tomorrow we begin a better tomorrow. this nation is going to begin to change for the better tomorrow. >> the latest poll from abc news and the washington post suggests 50% of likely voters will cast their ballots for obama. 47% for romney. polls indicate a close race in eight states. some suggest the candidates are runni
. suzanne pratt takes a look at what's become a booming business. >> reporter: it used to be consumers would buy private label products to clean their bathrooms or wash their clothes. lately, however, they're eating them, too. from sodas to peanut butter, private label brands are shaking off the yuck! stigma and attracting value-conscious customers. and it's the popularity of private label food that's behind the tasty conagra-ralcorp deal. >> private label, otherwise known as store brands, is ining traction with retailers and shoppers. in fact, store brands have been growing faster than branded food for some time, and we expect that to continue. >> reporter: it might be hard to believe, but store brands now account for about a fifth of all packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other w
charges and aees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and b
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 p
model is at war with life on this planet. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnie corporation onew york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the be
. ♪ >>> welcome. to the story of a warrior, told in his own words. what he has to say is for all of us to hear, but especially those of us who have never been in combat. karl marlantes, a small-town boy from oregon, the son of a soldier, a graduate of yale, landed in vietnam in october 1968 and was placed in charge of 1st platoon, charlie company, 1st battalion, 4th marine regiment. one year later he came home with two purple hearts, the navy cross, the bronze star, ten air medals, and memories that screamed at him. in the late '90s he asked the veterans administration for help and began treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. two years ago he published a novel. he had been working on it ever since he came home from vietnam. "matterhorn: the story of a yung second lieutenant leading a rifle platoon of 40 rines on a remote jungle hill." critics called it "a powerhouse -- tense, brutal honest," "unforgettable," "moving and intense." karl marlantes has now written a second book, a nonfiction memoir and meditation on what it is like to go to war. read it and you will be closer than you can i
. >> what's at stake is the future of america. >> it costs us, and taxes us, too much. >> american future fund is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> ryssdal: i knew right away this wasn't going to be the usual story on campaign finance. one of the first surprises was finding myself driving the dark streets of denver with attorney alan schwartz, who shared kind of a strange experience. >> it was early january of 2011, and my wife, who had just been reelected to the colorado state senate, goan e-mail from someone who claimed to have some information about a group that had sent out some attack ads against my wife. >> ryssdal: the guy said he had some documents, and a week later... >> i heard from this individual again. still not identifying himself, but telling me that if i wanted to see the documents, then i needed to get them that day. >> ryssdal: had to be that day. >> had to be that day. >> ryssdal: schwartz agreed to meet the guy who said the documents were stashed in a safe house that he would take him to. >> i didt know where were going. for the half-hour that we drov
folks are looking for-- and i think all of us agree on this-- is action. >> reporter: speaker pelosi suggested the leaders agree on milestones that will bolster the economy. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should show some milestones of success so that confidence can build as we reach our solution. >> reporter: over the last week markets had grown increasingly pessimistic about avoiding the fiscal cliff. today's tone provided some relief, but it's clear major hurdles remain. >> how much do rates have to go up? what can republicans accept on that and what can the democrats accept in terms of structural reform of entitlements? i think those are the two big sticking points and those are going to remain the sticking points. and if you can figure out what's going to happen there, you can figure out whether there is going to be a deal and when that deal might happen. >> serious negotiating begins after thanksgiving. susie. >> susie: you know, darren, you talked about the mood of cooperation, and listening to th
here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> ro: a policihks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and technology are ging us
to have you with us. like many others in the nation, faith groups are assessing the impact of this week's election. according to exit polls, president obama won a slight majority of catholic voters overall, thanks largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among religious voters, they ranked these issues a little further down on the spectrum. >> ralph reed of the faith and freedom coalition admitted that a massive mobilization among religious conservatives wasn't enough
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers e
category called a typical antipsychotics. d it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just assumption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state government. because this category of drugs is a substantial expense for the medicaid program. >> what's the cost between haldol and the new drug that came out? >> it's a difference between haldol and a entire category, the a typical antisigh cotics. it's a many expense. that doesn't mean haldol is the right drug for every patient but what this study demonstrate said when you look at a large population, for a substantial number of patients, the older now available as a generic drug, is in fact more effective at controlling symptoms than the newer category of drugs. so it just speaks to the issue of first of all, the treatment needs to be at a lord to the individual and that if -- tailored -- we need to enter into the prescribing proc
'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. much of the east coast is still grappling with the devastation of hurricane sandy. the storm affected at least 17 states, caused massive flooding and left millions without power. religious leaders, including pope benedict xvi, prayed for the victims and for a strong recovery. and many faith-based groups quickly rallied to help those impacted by the storm. among them, the north american mission board, the relief arm of the southern baptist convention. mike ebert is the mission board's vice president for communications. he joins us from the board's headquarters in atlanta, georgia. mike, welcome. let me begin with getting -- inviting you to talk about the extent of the sbc's efforts here. how many people do you have? what are you doing? >> well, bob, we have 82,000 trained disaster relief volunteers. 1,500 disaster relief units and we will by monday be at a 400,000 meal capacity. so we'll be preparing 400,000 hot meals to be served to victims and other first responders and that will be kind of the beginning point for us. we'll
: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago toys r us. manager danny soro thinks up to 10,000 shoppers will descend on the store when it opens thanksgiving evening, forcing his 300 employees to cut short their holiday. >> we open at 8:00 and we're expecting lines to start from 5 pm to go pretty much throughout the plaza. >> reporter: walmart, kmart, and sears are also opening tomorrow at 8pm; target's opening at 9:00pm. and while opening on turkey day is expected to mean big business for retailers, it's ruffling the feathers of many employees who won't get paid overtime to work the holiday. >> i feel very frustrated about this situation. >> reporter: walmart associate charmaine givens is scheduled to work two eight hour shifts with a three hour break starting tomorrow at 7 pm. >> i'm not gonna do that, no. >> reporter: you're just not going to show up? >> i'm going to call in. i'm gonna call in. i'm not going to just abandon the job. i'm gonna call in and i'm gonna state how i feel. >> reporter: givens hopes to join other walmart emploes around the country in a protest outside the chai
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 0 years. bnf, t engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling becauswe d't he por. w
heroes because they stood up and said, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks'yes some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think that th
been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in ga
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
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